In subcultural studies, repurposing of things, clothing and artefacts is recognized as ‘bricolage’.

In subcultural studies, repurposing of things, clothing and artefacts is recognized as ‘bricolage’.

It turns‘the known fact to be under surveillance to the pleasure to be watched. ’ Dick Hebdige, Hiding in the Light: On pictures and Things ( London: Routledge, 1988), 8.

Inside the 1956 novel, Benno Pludra attracts on the clashes during the beaches to argue into the sea that it was decadent West Germans (and their East German consorts) who had been undressing people by force and throwing them. Pludra repeats the nudist version that partial clothing is more exciting than none after all. Their protagonist, Paul, shows how titillated he could be by the notion of Haik’s little breasts, braless under a pullover that is tight. Benno Pludra, Haik und Paul (Berlin: Neues Leben, 1956), 10. It had been associations with Western commercialization for the human body by way of mag pin-ups, youth fashion (such as the bikini) and popular social expressions of sex, that made general public nudity seem so threatening. Continue reading “In subcultural studies, repurposing of things, clothing and artefacts is recognized as ‘bricolage’.”